Benefits of Protein

Benefits of Protein

Image courtesy of Apolonia at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Apolonia at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Protein is one of the essential nutrients in our bodies, crucial for building our muscles and tissue regeneration. It is also necessary for the functioning of our immune system and provides our bodies with energy. Although following recommended daily intake should be easy, there are many myths about protein that can confuse us. According to medical experts, recommended daily dose for protein intake is about 50 grams for women and 65 grams for men. One of those myths is that we will gain muscle mass if we eat a high protein diet. In reality, it can be true only for athletes. But people, who do not exercise, will hardly build their muscles with higher doses of protein. Furthermore, high protein diet can prevent a person from gaining weight if she/ he intends to. Highly protein’s quantities send the signals to our brains that we are already full-fed. But, if we hold onto recommended daily quantities, the benefits of protein are huge. The article ” Protein: Health Benefits, Deficiency, Sources of Protein” addresses those benefits.

Benefits of Protein

Proteins are indispensable for growth and maintenance of every kind of cell in our body. Body development, replenishment of lost blood, healing of wounds and scars, replacement of dead cells, and hair and nail growth need proteins. Proteins in the form of enzymes, hormones and antibodies promote healthy metabolic and physiological processes, and boost our nervous and immunity systems. In situations when fat and carbohydrate food sources are not providing adequate calories, proteins are degraded to generate the calories our body needs.

Another article, titled “What Are the Benefits of Proteins in a Balanced Diet?” lists additional benefits of protein:

Disease Prevention
Some types of protein may help reduce your risk of chronic diseases. According to the Harvard School of Public Health, eating a diet high in vegetable sources of protein and fat can reduce your risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes. The Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University specifically lists legumes, which include beans, peanuts, lentils and soybeans, as a type of protein-containing food that can help your body control blood sugar levels and lower your cholesterol. Although research on proteins and chronic diseases is still on going, including good sources of proteins in your diet can help you stay healthy.

There is just one thing, which is important to consider. We tend to think that we need the same amount of protein throughout our lives. Actually, our needs vary through different life cycles. For example, an old lady and a pregnant woman will have distinct needs for proteins. Additionally, after 40 our muscle mass significantly decreases, and this phenomenon is better known as sarcopenia. To help our body to minimize the loss of muscle mass, higher intake of protein and regular exercise can make miracles. The higher percentage of the protein induces synthesis of muscle proteins. Not only that protein prevents our bodies from losing muscle mass, but also helps them to recover. If we pay attention to protein intake and physical activity, we can prevent or alleviate many inconvenient health issues that can emerge from the weak body.

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