What Food Can Alleviate Mouth Ulcers?

What Food Can Alleviate Mouth Ulcers?

Image courtesy of SOMMAI at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of SOMMAI at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

What Food Can Alleviate Mouth Ulcers? Mouth ulcers have not considered a serious health issue, but they are undoubtfully uncomfortable and painful. Medical experts are not quite sure about the causes of mouth ulcers, but they are harmless and last up to two weeks. There is not enough research about their successful treatment, but there are certain types of food that we should avoid. Peanuts, almonds, chocolate, tomatoes, strawberries, coffee, dairy products, etc. However, experts agree that weaken the immune system as well as viral infections can greatly contribute to their appearance. In many cases, there is a hereditary factor beyond. Even though experts consider mouth ulcers as a benign phenomenon, they suggest visiting a physician if ulcers last more than two weeks or show as extremely large and painful. They suggest medical help when mouth ulcers occur repeatedly. The last can indicate a serious illness such as Chron’s disease, celiac disease, reactive arthritis, Behcet disease, etc. Sometimes, we just need more of vitamin C or B12, while other times the iron supplies can hit their lowest point. To prevent and ease mouth ulcers, the article “What to Eat to Beat Mouth Ulcers” offers us advice on food that can alleviate them.

What Food Can Alleviate Mouth Ulcers?

When your mouth does flare up, the first thing to reach for is something of a mouthful in itself: diglcyrrhirisinated liquorice (DGL, available from health-food stores), which, by increasing the production of mucin, both soothes the ulcer and helps it to heal more quickly.

Alternatively, break open a vitamin E capsule and gently dab the contents onto the ulcer or else rub a little set honey, a crushed sage leaf or a peeled garlic clove – all natural antiseptics – over the sore.

If raw garlic doesn’t appeal, try switching to garlic-rich dishes, along with soft, non-acidic foods, such as my omelette, mashed potatoes, soufflés or mild, sauce-based foods like spaghetti carbonara, but avoid such acidic foods as citrus fruits, tomatoes, vinegars, pickles and ketchup while you’re waiting for the ulcer to clear up.

Having a daily pot of natural live yoghurt containing lactobacillus, acidophilus or bifida bacteria can speed your recovery, too, while some of my patients have found cranberry juice (which is especially soothing when combined with ice cubes) a useful ally when they’re feeling run down, overly stressed or otherwise vulnerable to a mouth-ulcer attack.

On the other hand, mouth ulcers can be a sign that our immunity takes its downward course. Periods of intense stress and anxiety, sleep deprivation, and a poor diet with very little physical activity can undermine our immune system. One of the first signs that our bodily response to infections and disease is somehow threatened can be mouth ulcers. They also can appear as a result of hormonal changes, especially in women. Even though mouth ulcers are pretty uncomfortable, they can trigger the need for greater self-care. If taken as a catalyst for a healthier lifestyle, they show as beneficial in the long run.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *