Category: HIV AIDS

In 1980, no one knew about Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) or Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Now almost everyone is aware. Still, many people do not know how HIV is transmitted, and who is at risk for infection. Nearly one million people are HIV infected in the United States. About 10% of these have AIDS. AIDS is the disease caused by infection with HIV.

A Co-Worker Is HIV Infected 0

A Co-Worker Is HIV Infected

A Co-Worker Is HIV Infected Learning that someone you work with has HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, should not be alarming. Many at your work site may react with fear, and others may feel helpless and not know what to do. Knowing more about HIV will help everyone feel more comfortable. Here are the facts. HIV is NOT transmitted through casual contact such as: A Co-Worker Is HIV Infected holding hands or hugging sneezing or coughing insect bites or sharing food, drink, or work space HIV is passed to others by: direct intimate contact with body fluids, such as blood, vaginal secretions, or semen an HIV-infected mother to her baby during pregnancy having sexual intercourse without a latex or plastic condom with an HIV-positive partner and sharing contaminated needles Most people do not work in places where there is risk for blood- to-blood exposure. Those who are at risk for such exposure at work include healthcare workers, laboratory staff, and public safety workers. Very few people have been infected with HIV through occupational exposure. In these cases the source has been a patient, not a co- worker. HIV is a weak virus. It cannot live for long outside of...

HIV Information 0

HIV Information

Aids: The Latest News AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It is a disease caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Most people who are infected with HIV eventually develop AIDS. There may be a small percentage of people with HIV who will never develop AIDS. When people develop AIDS, their immune systems are slowly destroyed. People with AIDS get diseases called opportunistic diseases or infections. The weakened immune system no longer can provide protection for these diseases. HIV Information     The bad news about HIV is how much it has spread. Over twenty million people in the world have HIV. Nearly a million of them live in the United States. Many people with HIV have not been tested and do not realize that they have the virus.     There is good news, however, about new treatments for HIV and AIDS. Many new discoveries are helping people with HIV. How many viruses are actually in the bloodstream can now be measured. These tests are much more helpful in showing how well anti-viral medications are working.     There are two classes of medications that are helping people with HIV. They work by keeping the virus from reproducing and...

Hiv/Aids: In The Global Community 0

Hiv/Aids: In The Global Community

Hiv/Aids: In The Global Community Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a global problem. In 1996, the World Health Organization reported that there were 21 million cases of HIV infection around the world. As many as 40 to 60 million cases are expected by the year 2000. So many people are infected with HIV, that it is considered a world-wide epidemic. Hiv/Aids: In The Global Community     Although many think of HIV as an infection of gays and IV drug users, over 75% of the cases worldwide are due to sexual contact between a man and woman. New cases are occurring most rapidly in the developing nations within Africa, Asia, and South and Central America. There are around 14 million cases of HIV in southern African countries such as Uganda and Zaire. Equal numbers of men and women are infected there. A big problem there is the infection is passed from mother to child. Many children who escape HIV are left orphaned by their infected parents. The United States, Europe, and Australia have stable rates of infection. This means that the same number of people die each year from AIDS as new people are infected with the virus. The U.S....

Hiv/Aids: Myths And Misconceptions 0

Hiv/Aids: Myths And Misconceptions

Hiv/Aids: Myths And Misconceptions In the past, people have had good reason to be afraid of “catching” diseases. Although they had many explanations about why people became ill and died, they did not know what caused a disease, or how to avoid it. Now, we have the benefit of science to provide us with answers. We now know how to prevent HIV infection. However, myths and misconception, continue to develop. Hiv/Aids: Myths And Misconceptions Some common myths regarding how you can get HIV are by: sharing food with an infected person hugging an infected person an insect bite being a gay or bisexual man or being an IV drug user Science has provided us with answers to these myths. HIV is not transmitted through casual contact. Even in family members where there is on-going close contact there have been no cases of non- sexual transmission. Insects are not able to transmit HIV. Finally, the highest increases in new infections are in women, heterosexuals, and teens. HIV does not discriminate as to age, sex, race, or sexual orientation. Remember: not everyone who is HIV positive knows they are infected! HIV is passed to others by: direct intimate contact with body fluids,...

Introduction – HIV AIDS 0

Introduction – HIV AIDS

Introduction – HIV AIDS In 1980, no one knew about Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) or Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Now almost everyone is aware. Still, many people do not know how HIV is transmitted, and who is at risk for infection. Nearly one million people are HIV infected in the United States. About 10% of these have AIDS. AIDS is the disease caused by infection with HIV.         It takes an average of 11 years before someone infected with the HIV virus actually develops AIDS. During this time, many people who are infected feel fine, look well, and may not know they have the virus. Unfortunately they can pass the virus on to others during these years.     HIV is passed to others by:   direct intimate contact with body fluids, such as blood, vaginal secretions, or semen an HIV-infected mother to her baby during pregnancy having sexual intercourse without a latex or plastic condom with an HIV-positive partner and sharing contaminated needles Casual contact does not transmit HIV. People of any age, race, or sex can become infected if exposed. The fastest growing groups include heterosexuals, women, and teens. HIV is an “equal opportunity virus.”...

MINORITIES AND HIV 0

MINORITIES AND HIV

MINORITIES AND HIV Anyone who is sexually active, regardless of age, sex, race, or sexual orientation, is at risk for AIDS. Minority populations are especially at risk. AIDS cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control in the United States for minorities are: African-American, one out of every three. Hispanic, one out of every six. The rates among Native Americans, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders are still low, but it is feared that these numbers will rise as well. Why are the numbers so much higher with African-Americans and Hispanics? There are many theories including: minorities have less access to healthcare and education or minorities may be less likely to take precautions while having sex or using injection drugs Sometimes it takes knowing someone with HIV or AIDS to make the danger real to people. Unfortunately, more and more Hispanic and African-American people are having this experience. What can you do to avoid getting HIV? If you use needles to inject drugs, use new needles or clean your needles before and after re- using them. There is a 3-step cleaning process that uses bleach to disinfect needles. The steps must be done immediately before and after using the needle. Contact...

Testing For The Aids Virus 0

Testing For The Aids Virus

Deciding to get tested for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, is not an easy decision. However, a person can have HIV without showing any signs. There is no way to know, without testing, if a person is infected.   HIV is passed to others by:   direct intimate contact with body fluids, such as blood, vaginal secretions, or semen an HIV-infected mother to her baby during pregnancy having sexual intercourse without a latex or plastic condom with an HIV-positive partner and sharing contaminated needles As soon as a person is infected with HIV, antibodies against the virus begin to form. The presence of these antibodies is used as a test for HIV. Even though a person may be infected with HIV, he or she may not test positive for up to six months.     Two blood tests are used to check for HIV. They both must be positive before a person is said to be HIV-positive. If one is positive and the other is not, both tests should be repeated in one month. Testing for HIV is confidential, and some centers offer anonymous testing.     Confidential testing assures that your results will be guarded with care. Only...

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